amNewYork

Long Island City restaurants: Best bets for brunch, barbecue, more

At the southwesternmost corner of Queens, Long Island City boasts proximity to midtown Manhattan, East River views and enough growth in recent years to see an influx of people – and the places they want to eat.So hop on any number of trains and find an array of new favorite restaurants, from a French cafe to your new favorite brunch spot.

Hibino LIC (pictured): "This is fundamental Japanese food," says Nobu Shiozawa, a Hibino LIC partner. "That's what we are trying to introduce to the neighborhood." Though it initially opened in Cobble Hill, in 2013, now LICers have easy access to fresh Japanese cuisine via Hibino's array of entrees -- Shiozawa recommends the salmon miso zuke, broiled miso-marinated salmon with seasonal vegetables (pictured) as well as the fresh-made tofu, served simply with ginger, scallions and a soy-dashi sauce -- and sushi.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

What to do and eat in Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Nestled between Clinton Hill and Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene has an array of restaurants, shopping options and even the borough’s first park, the namesake Fort Greene Park.

History, dating to the 1700s, lines the streets of this neighborhood, named for a Revolutionary War general and fort. I in 1978, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission named part of Fort Greene a Historic District. Fort Greene is also home to the Williamsburgh Savings Bank at One Hanson Place, which was once the tallest building in Brooklyn at 512 feet high. One of the borough's oldest financial institutions, it was built between 1927 and '29 and designated as a New York City landmark in 1977, followed by its interior in 1996.

Fort Greene Park (pIt's no coincidence that Fort Greene Park is located within the Fort Greene Historic District of Brooklyn: The 30-acre space dates back to Revolutionary War days. In addition to being a picnic spot, urbanites head to the Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux-designed park for its history. Visit the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, shown, which towers 149 feet above the park and is topped with a 20-foot bronze urn; it honors the 11,500 captives who died on British prison ships in nearby Wallabout Bay during the war.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Best bread in Brooklyn, all from family-run bakeries

Some of the highest-quality carbs in the the five boroughs can be found at Brooklyn’s family-owned bakeries and wholesale businesses. From traditional loaves of Italian bread to French classics like baguettes, seasonal varieties (Irish soda bread) to flavorful twists (cranberry-raisin with sunflower seeds), the possibilities are nearly endless for anyone in need of a bread fix. Here are eight of our Brooklyn favorites.

Caputo's Bakery: In business since 1904, a fifth generation of the Caputo family is now in charge. Current owner James Caputo, who lived above the bakery at 329 Court St. growing up, gives a nod to his father for the business' success: "As the neighborhood changed, we adapted to it." More recently, the inventory has grown with additions including olive bread, cranberry-walnut and brioche.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Queens pizza: Best slices and pies in the NYC borough

These are the pizza kings of Queens. Looking for a quick slice or a personal pie? Do you want a classic pizza or a creative take on the classic? We've got you covered. Pizza rarely, if ever, disappoints. But here are 10 of our favorite borough spots. 

Basil Brick Oven Pizza (pictured): Ugo Mattei, who's originally from Naples, opened Basil Brick Oven Pizza in 2011. The pizzeria uses OO flour imported from Italy, a lighter, higher quality flour that pairs well with fresh ingredients like the San Marzano tomatoes, sea salt, fresh mozzarella and olive oil used at the restaurant. "All natural fermentation, that's the trick," Mattei said of how the pizza dough is prepared before it's topped and put inside the restaurant's wood-burning brick oven. Basil Brick Oven Pizza offers 37 different personal pizzas (no slices), but we recommend the basil pizza, pictured, complete with pesto sauce, fresh mozzarella, oven-baked rosemary potatoes, pine nuts, extra virgin olive oil and of course, basil. The 12-inch pizzas range in price from $10 to $17. 

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Jacqueline Novak releases 'How to Weep in Public,' a book on depression

In the introduction of Jacqueline Novak's book, “How to Weep in Public: Feeble offerings on depression from someone who knows,” the New York-based comedian does not claim to offer any beneficial exercises or relief from what a reader may be going through -- she simply offers to keep them company. Novak said that's her way of communicating to readers: “It’s cool.” Novak is a stand-up comedian, but her book surpasses what can be conveyed through a 20-minute routine on stage. Her writing style and the concept of providing shelter for her readers are what make this book on depression stand out. In an interview with amNewYork, Novak said she began writing for the book during a particularly depressing time in her life. As someone who writes frequently, she noticed how her depression was trickling into whatever she attempted to create. “Instead of trying to hide it or transcend it, I thought ‘How can I make this time useful?’” she said.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro 

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro 

Bob Woodward talks 'The Last of the President's Men' at Cooper Union in NYC

Bob Woodward is back with another revealing book about former President Richard Nixon's Watergate scandal. "The Last of the President's Men," released Tuesday by Simon & Schuster, tells the story of Alexander Butterfield, Nixon's aide who disclosed the secret White House taping system that led to Nixon's resignation. Woodward, 72, wrote "The Last of the President's Men" after 46 hours of interviews with Butterfield and close examination of thousands of original documents. "In many ways it's an odyssey story," Woodward said. Butterfield's perspective changed the way Woodward thinks about Nixon because it provides the other side of the Watergate story, Woodward explained.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Secrets of the St. Patrick's Day parade in NYC

New York City's St. Patrick's Day parade makes its way along Fifth Avenue for the 254th time on March 17, placing it among the oldest parades in the country. And with anywhere from 150,000 to 250,000 people turning out to march annually, it has the most participants of any parade in the world. The inaugural St. Patrick's Day parade in New York City was held on March 17, 1762, by Irish ex-patriots and members of the British Army who were deployed in the colony of New York. They were ecstatic to show off Irish pride, particularly because it was illegal to wear green during this time in Ireland, according to theparade's website. Notably, the parade doesn't feature floats, automobiles or commercial vehicles -- just people. In a news release from the White House on Feb. 29, President Barack Obama designated March 2016 as Irish-American Heritage Month. He spoke highly of the positive influence Irish people have had on our country and what's to come in the future.

Photo credit: Nikki Brady 

Photo credit: Nikki Brady 

Nassau Herald

Extra! Extra! Read all about high school newspapers

Empowering experiences, expressing opinions, learning about a range of topics and understanding how to work collaboratively and independently are all part of working on school newspapers, students and faculty advisers said.The Herald spent time with seven of these publications to find out what’s beyond the printed or online pages. 

Hewlett Spectrum, Hewlett High School — “It prepares teenagers for any profession,” Eliana Berger, 16, of Hewlett, said, of how working with the Spectrum staff builds confidence, promotes teamwork and improves writing skills. She is a junior assistant entertainment editor who will be the entertainment editor next year. The Hewlett Spectrum publishes six issues per year. “It’s a way to express our opinions,” Senior Janna Bickoff, 17, co-After Hours editor with Lindsay Cohn, said of her newspaper experience. She has been involved since her freshmen year as a writer for the After Hours section, which covers the high school’s extra curricular activities.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Raising heart health awareness at South Nassau Communities Hospital

“Where’s my lipstick?” were the first words she spoke to her doctor, having regained consciousness once again, four days after her heart stopped beating. Woodmere resident Heidi Farkas, 60, shared her story at South Nassau Communities Hospital on Thursday, the day before National Wear Red Day — so named to raise awareness for women’s heart health. Farkas’s heart failed on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 2014. She was getting ready one morning to go to New Jersey for a grandson’s birthday party when she started feeling weak, and decided to stay home. Throughout the day, she recounted, she felt progressively worse, and thought she might have the flu.

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

A journey back in time

With nothing but the sound of traffic outside on Broadway and the intermittent chiming of clocks inside of Old Timers, an antique clock and repair store, at 1192 Broadway in Hewlett, Mark Lindenbaum sat at his workstation toward the back of the store and repaired a clock made in the 1870s by Connecticut-based Ansonia Brass and Copper Company. 

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

the Torch

Awaken your senses with 'Spring Awakening'

 Close your eyes for 10 seconds. Welcome back. In those brief moments, maybe without even realizing it, your four other senses intensified. Perhaps you became aware of how this paper feels in your hands, maybe you just noticed your gum lost its flavor or possibly you are rolling your eyes at a conversation unfolding nearby. According to an article from Scientific American, "the study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, shows people who are born deaf use areas of the brain typically devoted to processing sound to instead process touch and vision." When we disengage one of our senses, the others are amplified. This spellbinding revival of "Spring Awakening," based on Frank Wedekind's 1981 play, features American Sign Language fully integrated into the English performance by both deaf and hearing cast members. 

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro

Magazine Journalism class 

From Foundation to Flatbread: The Story of Charleston Flats

The late-afternoon sun is beating down on an 85-degree day in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina as Laura and Steve Favreau arrive at New South Brewing on their creative flatbread food truck, Charleston Flats. The husband and wife team will be feeding visitors to the local brewery from 4 to 7 p.m., a weekly stop for them. Although they just officially launched their food truck for business in January, they have the prep down to a science. Generally speaking, the concept of food trucks fits seamlessly into modern day practices of instant gratification and quick, yet quality on-the-go dining. The story of Charleston Flats is a classic tale of what can happen when you give up everything to pursue your dream. 

Photo credit: Diana Colapietro